United States Mint Reports
for the Years 1792 to 1892


© 2000-2017 by Paul R. Hybert
(email: prhybert@att.net )

These years cover the eras of Large Cents, Bust coinage, and the Liberty Seated coinage; all collecting interests of mine.

This is my latest web project; bringing more numismatic information to the web. These reports are in the public domain; my copyright applies to the formatting and presentation structure. So, does that mean you can strip out the HTML tags and do as you will with what remains? I cannot say; I am not a lawyer, so I do not give out legal advice.

My library contains the reports for the following years, and I wish to acquire the reports from the years not listed.

Key
In the following table, one row contains the information on each item:

The following reports are for the listed calendar year.
1790 III.1.10 A report from the Secretary of State, Thomas Jefferson, to the House, detailing his objections to the overseas minting of U.S. coins. In response to a private British proposal to Congress to mint copper coins.
1791 III.1.24 A report from the Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton, to the House, detailing the results of his inquirires and reflections on the establishment of a mint. Also includes some papers, from various sources, that were not communicated to the House by Mr. Hamilton.
1793 III.1.42 A brief report from the Director of the Mint, David Rittenhouse, to the Secretary of State, Thomas Jefferson, who relayed it to the House. The results of the assays of locally available silver and gold coins of France, England, Spain, and Portugal.
1793 III.1.56 A report from the Secretary of State, Thomas Jefferson, to President Washington who relayed it to the Senate. Suitable chief mint employees can barely be found; coinage of the precious metals has not commenced because they cannot provide the required bond. An important position, handling as much precious metal as the coiner, has been created at the mint without authorization by Congress.
1794 III.1.60 A short note from Mint Director David Rittenhouse, showing how the mint can make a profit from making money. Rittenhouse adds his comments to a note, from the coiner, on producing the copper coinage.
1794 III.1.71 A note from mint director David Rittenhouse to Secretary of State Edmund Randolph, finally being relayed to the Senate by President Washington. A beginning has been made in coining the precious metals, but a parcel of blank dollars awaits a more powerful press to coin them. The large quantity of copper will be processed so as not to interfere with the silver coinage.
1795 III.1.81 A report from the committee tasked with examining the current state of the mint and reporting on further measures. Staff responsibilities and mint procedures are some of the addressed areas.
1795 III.1.84 The Secretary of State, Thomas Pickering, relays reports from two mint Directors. The fineness of the silver coinage is not as authorized by Congress. Coinage of silver and gold is halted due to the transition between Directors and the death of the assayer.
1796 A report from mint director Elias Boudinot to President Washington, via Secretary of State Timothy Pickering, who relayed it to Congress at the President’s direction. The mint learns the minting business through experience. A Melter and Refiner is added to the staff to process the large amounts of deposited bullion of nonstandard fineness. The requirement that depositors be paid in coin struck from that depositor’s bullion makes for costly and inefficient procedures. The pieces set aside for the assay commission are taken from the amount due the depositors, so the depositors complain.
1797 III.1.111 A report from the committee tasked with examining the changes suggested in the mint director’s 1796 report. They recommend appropriating money to buy silver and gold for coinage; and another amount to cover wastage in coining silver and gold, along with a loss of silver during an accident.
1797 III.1.117 A report from the committee tasked with examining the act regulating foreign coins. It appears that little US silver coinage circulates distant from the mint, and foreign coins still are heavily used. They recommend that the period for accepting foreign silver and gold coins be extended beyond the previous limit. A Treasury circular of November, 1797 is attached — silver French crowns will be accepted beyond the lawful period, and information on which coins are current locally is requested.
1797 III.1.118 A report from the mint Director, responding to an order from the House, stating the quantities of silver and gold coins produced since the report of about a year earlier. The individual deposits of silver and gold are listed by date, and give the depostor name, bullion weight, value, and type of deposited items. The mint works with local banks to receive deposits that are small enough to process quickly.
1797 A report from the mint Director, following the above mid-December report by less than two months. Perhaps that is why this report was not included in American State Papers. Bob Julian found this report in a Correspondence Book of the Treasury Department. The amount of gold, silver, and copper coins produced in 1797 is given, along with the total value since the Mint opened. The number of workmen was reduced due to the small amout of silver bullion deposited, but the anticipated supply in 1798 justifies an increase in the staff. The horses can provided power for no more than two hours at a time, and they get in the way; a steam engine would supercede the horses, and it could also power some equipment that now is manually powered. The price of the engine would be saved in two or three years.
1798 III.1.121 A report from the Secretary of the Treasury, Oliver Wolcott. Although the mint director could receive, from the Bank of the United States, foreign silver and gold coins for recoinage into coins of the United States, appropriate foreign silver coins were not available, and the foreign gold coins had more value in foreign commerce. Since the proclamation of the President, foreign silver coins other than Spanish dollars and their parts now are available for the mint at the Bank.
1798 III.1.134 A report from the Committee of Claims, regarding a petition by John Vaughn. For most of 1797, the mint produced silver coins containing more silver than the law authorized. A depositor of silver bullion thereby received fewer coins than expected, even though the coins cointained the deposited amount of silver. The petitioner lost more than $2,000 on a deposit of more than 230,000 ounces of silver, and the committee feel this claim has merit.
1799 III.1.140 A report from mint director Elias Boudinot to President Adams, who relayed it to Congress. The number of each denomination minted in 1798 is given; the value of the 1798 coins nearly double the value in any preceding year. The unprotected state of the mint should be reconsidered in light of the scheme, detected last summer, for robbing the mint.
1799 III.1.141 A letter from the Comptroller of the Treasury, accompanying the first of the required reports on the finances of the mint. This report covers from the establishment of the mint to the present, and future reports will be issued annually.
1799 III.1.144 A report from mint director Elias Boudinot to President Adams, who relayed it to Congress. The number of each denomination minted in 1799 is given, along with the value of gold, silver, and copper pieces coined since start of operations. One press can coin 14,000 cents each day, if the planchettes are available. The upcoming move of all government offices to the new seat of government includes the Mint; but complications to Mint operations are anticipated. With no law preventing the private melting of gold and silver coins, that practice is feared to become common.
1800 III.1.148 A report from the Senate committee that reviewed the recent report from the mint. In light of the large expense of the mint relative to the small amount of its coinage since its founding seven years ago, the required move of the mint to the seat of government provides a good opportunity to close the mint, use foreign silver and gold coins as legal tender, and contract out the manufacture of cents and half cents.
1800 III.1.156 A report from mint director Elias Boudinot to President Adams, who relayed it to Congress. The number of each denomination minted in 1800 is given, along with the profit on striking copper pieces in 1800 and the total of copper pieces coined since the start of operations. The great rise in the price of copper limited the number of copper pieces struck. The move of all government offices to the new seat of government means that the named officers will not be available at the mint for the upcoming annual assay inspection. The mint assayer has determined that the Spanish milled doubloons, previously made a legal tender at about eighty-seven cents per pennyweight, contain less than eighty-five cents of gold per pennyweight.
1801 III.1.161 A report from mint director Elias Boudinot to President Adams, who relayed it to Congress. The required assay of reserved pieces was not performed because none of the government officials attended — the depositors demand their property, and the Mint Director awaits instruction from the President on that matter as well as on the impending expiration of the authorization of the Mint.
1801 III.1.172 A report from mint director Elias Boudinot to President Jefferson, who relayed it to Congress. The number of each denomination minted in 1801 is given, and it is noted that most of the used gold was deposited as bullion or lumps. As mentioned in past reports, the director has not seen the notice, as required by law after more than $50,000 of the cents and half cents have been deposited at the Treasury, that no other copper coins are current; presently, more than $93,000 of the copper coins have been deposited.
1802 III.1.180 A report from Comptroller of the Treasury John Steele to Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin, who relayed it to the House. The required statements cover more than two years of appropriations, expenditures, and other operations of the Mint; these statements were absent from the last two annual reports by the Mint Director.
1802 III.1.182 While Congress considers abolishing the mint, Treasury Secretary Gallatin forwards to the House two letters recently received from the mint director, and one letter received from mint engraver Robert Scot. An order for 20 to 25 tons of copper planchettes was placed in England last fall, with delivery this spring, and to be coined during the summer if the mint continues. The requested listing of the mint’s property is provided — due to its specialized nature, some property might not bring even half its value at public auction. Should the mint be retained: consider selling the current small lots in the heart of the city and buying an advantageous lot in a less public place, and the machinery should be powered by steam instead of horses. Some private offers of producing the national coinage are made.
1802 III.2.191 A short report from mint director Elias Boudinot to President Jefferson, who relayed it to Congress. Fifteen thousand cents are struck each day, drawing from the near twenty-four tons of copper planchettes on hand. If the mint will not be abolished as discussed in the past Congress, at least five hundred dollars will be needed to purchase two additional horses and for repairs to the present machinery.
1802 III.2.198 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Duvall to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1803 III.2.211 A short report from mint director Elias Boudinot to President Jefferson, who relayed it to Congress. Coin production is way down, due to diminished deposits; production costs decline slightly.
1803 III.2.219 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Duvall to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1804 III.2.228 A short report from mint director Elias Boudinot to President Jefferson, who relayed it to Congress. About eleven thousand dollars of the gold coinage is produced from gold found in one county of North Carolina; more gold from that area is expected. The coinage of cents is less profitable due to the increased price of copper in Europe.
1804 III.2.233 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Duvall to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1805 III.2.239 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Jefferson, who relayed it to Congress. The large number of struck small silver pieces is in response to depositors; it adds to the supply of small change both directly and indirectly by preventing the exportation of the silver coinage.
1806 III.2.250 A short report from a House committee on a Senate bill regarding foreign coins as legal tender. Instead of removing legal tender status from the Spanish milled dollar as the Senate wishes, the House committee finds that the domestic coinage is insufficient for domestic commerce and therefore Spanish milled dollars as well as other foreign coins should be made a legal tender.
1805 III.2.252 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Duvall to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1806 III.2.261 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Jefferson, who relayed it to Congress. The value of the precious metal coinage is double the average annual value from the first ten years of production. Copper coinage is small due to a new screw and other repairs to the cent press.
1806 III.2.266 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Duvall to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1807 III.2.274 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Jefferson, who relayed it to Congress. Mint production is higher than in any former year, with more than two million pieces struck, having a face value of more than one million dollars.
1807 III.2.275 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Robert Patterson to Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin, who relayed it to Congress. Congress’ act of the 10th of April, 1806 fixed the values of certain foreign coins in common use; this report shows that some coins are correctly valued, some coins are slightly over valued, and others are considerably over valued.
1807 III.2.284 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Duvall to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1808 III.2.288 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Jefferson, who relayed it to Congress.
1808 III.2.299 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Duvall to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1809 III.2.306 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Robert Patterson to Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin, who relayed it to Congress.
1809 III.2.309 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Madison, who relayed it to Congress.
1809 III.2.318 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Duvall to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1810 III.2.330 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Robert Patterson to Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin, who relayed it to Congress.
1810 III.2.331 A House committee’s opinion on the legal tender status of certain foreign coins, based upon the latest assay results from Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin. Because the U.S. mint is not capable of satisfying the domestic coinage needs, certain foreign gold and silver coins should be granted legal tender status at specified rates for only three years; afterwards, Spanish milled dollars (and its parts) should be the only foreign coinage with legal tender status. Although the prior rate for Spanish gold coins was four per cent too high, the committee feels no relief should be provided to the current holders of Spanish gold coins when a corrected rate is established.
1810 III.2.332 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Madison, who relayed it to Congress.
1810 III.2.350 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Duvall to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1811 III.2.335 A report from Treasury Secretary Gallatin, as requested by the House, detailing the production of the mint from its establishment through the end of 1809; includes comments regarding the expense in refining bullion of non-standard fineness, the profit on the copper coinage, and other mint procedures.
1811 III.2.354 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Robert Patterson to Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin, who relayed it to Congress. Some verification needed.
1811 III.2.361 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Madison, who relayed it to Congress. Following the closing of the Bank of the United States, an adequate supply of bullion for coinage now is provided by other banks in Philadelphia.
1811 III.2.374 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Rush to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress. Something odd this year — the account for copper showed a loss instead of the usual gain, but it was a small loss.
1812 III.2.384 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Robert Patterson to Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin, who relayed it to Congress. Some verification needed.
1812 III.2.385 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Madison, who relayed it to Congress. More than half a million dollars worth of bullion deposits sits in mint vaults, awaiting coinage.
1812 III.2.392 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Rush to Treasury Secretary Gallatin who relayed it to Congress.
1813 III.2.401 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Robert Patterson to Acting Treasury Secretary William Jones, who relayed it to Congress.
1813 III.2.402 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Madison, who relayed it to Congress.
1813 III.2.419 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Bacon to Treasury Secretary Campbell who relayed it to Congress. Some verification needed.
1813 III.2.420 A petition to Treasury Secretary Campbell who forwarded it to Congress. Bankers of Baltimore experience a lack of gold coins; they ask that foreign gold coins be given legal tender status, and ask that the exportation of specie br prohibited.
1814 III.2.437 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Madison, who relayed it to Congress.
1814 III.2.445 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Acting Comptroller of the Treasury Lufborough to Treasury Secretary Dallas who relayed it to Congress. Some verification needed.
1815 III.3.461 A short report from mint director Robert Patterson to President Madison, who relayed it to Congress. The lack of bulion resulted in a very small coinage in 1815, but the facilities are capable of producing $47,000 worth of cents in one year.
1815 III.3.484 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Anderson to Treasury Secretary Dallas who relayed it to Congress. Some verification needed.
1816 III.3.477 A short report from Treasury Secretary Dallas, responding to a request from Chairman Calhoun of the Committee on the National Currency. To answer a domestic need, the gold and silver coins of certain nations should be made legal tender for three years; he concludes with the generally accepted assessments and valuations of the pieces.
1816 III.3.483 A report from Treasury Secretary Dallas, responding to a request from Chairman Calhoun of the Committee on the National Currency. The thoughts on what could be acceptable payment when collecting the dues of the Government — one idea is stamps on the notes from banks that do not pay in specie.
1816 III.3.487 Treasury Secretary Dallas relays, and agrees with, Mint Director Patterson’s answers to questions posed by a select committee on the copper and small silver coins of the United States. The committee recommends that no changes be made to the current coinage (dropping the half-cent and introducing a two-cent coin were among the discussed measures).
1816 A short report from mint director Patterson to President Madison, who relayed it to Congress. A brick building replaces wooden structures. A steam engine replaces some horse power. Some verification needed.
1816 III.3.493 A short report from mint director Patterson to President Madison, who relayed it to Congress. This report, from American State Papers, is the same as the above original report that was printed in 1817.
1816 III.3.508 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Anderson to Treasury Secretary Crawford who relayed it to Congress.
1817 Working on this report.
A short report from mint director Patterson to President Madison, as found in Copies of the Records, Reports, and Correspondence of the Mint Of the United States, Philadelphia, from 1796 to 1834. A brick building replaces wooden structures. A steam engine replaces some horse power. Some verification needed.
1817 III.3.507 Responding to a query from the Senate, Treasury Secretary Crawford feels no legislation is needed to effect a uniform circulating currency in the Union. The principal State banks will resume silver and gold specie payments on their notes; other banks are expected to follow. Due to the recent difficulties, the more than $14,000,000 in public money that was deposited in several banks employed by the Treasury included bank notes in addition to the usual specie. Some verification needed.
1817 III.3.536 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Anderson to Treasury Secretary Crawford who relayed it to Congress. Some verification needed.
1818 III.3.520 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Patterson to Treasury Secretary Crawford, who relayed it to Congress.
1818 III.3.540 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Patterson to Treasury Secretary Crawford, who relayed it to Congress. The results are very similar to those found earlier in the year.
1818 III.3.556 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Anderson to Treasury Secretary Crawford who relayed it to Congress. Some verification needed.
1819 III.3.549 Responding to a query from the Senate, Treasury Secretary Crawford feels legislation to limit exports of gold and silver coin is not needed. Such a measure can work only in extreme circumstances, and only for short periods. Free trade with moderate tariffs is the best means of effecting a balance of trade, which will halt the flow of precious metals out of the country.
1819 III.3.550 Responding to a query from the Senate, Treasury Secretary Crawford feels the mint can satisfy the need for gold coins, but feels foreign silver coins are needed for a few more years. He relays a letter, from mint director Patterson, that touches on production capabilities of the mint as well as the possible cause for the domestic scarcity of gold coins; he includes a London newspaper article on the ratio of gold to silver in Europe, as well as a listing of the fineness of silver coins as determined at the mint. Some verification needed.
1819 III.3.551 A committee report to the House of Representatives, starting with background information on the use and valuation of gold and silver, and ending with six recommendations as to the silver and gold coinage. The complicated nature of the question and solution of the metallic coinage is shown, quite unintentionally, by mentioning, early in the report, that gold is undervalued with respect to silver and a new ratio between them is needed, while the recommended changes in coin weights preserve the undervalued ratio.
1819 III.3.562 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Patterson to Treasury Secretary Crawford, who relayed it to Congress. Gold coins are again listed, although they no longer are current.
1820 III.3.575 A report by a House committee on Banks and the circulating money in the District of Columbia. The District has too many banks and institutions issuing their own notes. It is expected that a number of existing institutions would use the small proposed extension to existing charters to consolidate into fewer banks, or to wind down their affairs — but it is preferred to have two banks rather than one in each town of the District. Notes valued less than five dollars should no longer be circulated.
1820 III.3.582 A long report from Treasury Secretary Crawford, as requested by Congress, providing many details on the Bank of the United States and its offices. Also capital invested in chartered banks and details of these banks, as well as ideas on enabling a sufficient circulating medium — whether it be of gold and silver coin, or of paper. This last section provides an interesting survey of contemporary and historical balance of trade and circulating media.
1819 III.3.585 A short report from mint director Patterson to President Monroe, who relayed it to Congress. The small production was due to months with only small bullion deposits. With just a single press, and, of course, 80 tons of copper, 7.5 million cent pieces could be coined in a year.
1819 III.3.587 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Comptroller of the Treasury Anderson to Treasury Secretary Crawford who relayed it to Congress.
1820 III.3.591 A memorial from the legislature of Louisiana, detailing the hardships experienced due to the scarcity of gold resulting from the recent law that made foreign gold coins not current.
1820 III.3.618 A short report from mint director Patterson to President Monroe, who relayed it to Congress. The low production of gold and silver coins reflects the small bullion deposits, and the low copper coin production reflects the lack of public demand.
1820 III.3.621 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Treasury Secretary Crawford who sent it to Congress.
1821 III.3.610 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Patterson to Treasury Secretary Crawford, who relayed it to Congress. Gold coins are not listed, as they no longer are current.
1821 III.3.614 A committee report to the House of Representatives, that the low valuation of gold with respect to silver is the cause of the lack of gold coins in the United States. This report cites and repeats the findings of an earlier report, and this report accompanied a bill to correct the problem.
1821 III.3.625 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Robert Patterson to Acting Treasury Secretary Crawford, who relayed it to Congress. The recent assay results for the three types of foreign silver coins still current are stated — they are consistent with prior results. In case Congress is considering legislation regarding foreign coins, a statement of the average of the results, from the past five years, of assays on gold and silver coins is given. Some verification needed.
1821 III.3.626 A short report from mint director Patterson to President Monroe, who relayed it to Congress. Almost a quarter of the deposited silver bullion came from South America or Mexico.
1822 III.4.655 An assay of foreign silver coins, from mint director Robert Patterson to Treasury Secretary Crawford, who relayed it to Congress. The recent assay results for the three types of foreign silver coins still current are stated — they are consistent with prior results.
1822 III.4.676 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Treasury Secretary Crawford who sent it to Congress.
1823 III.4.664 A committee report to the House of Representatives, regarding the Mint, the laws regulating the coins of the United States, and the possible use of foreign gold coins. After providing historical background, and noting that the reports of rich copper ore deposits near Lake Superior imply a lower future cost of copper, the committee recommends: the Mint should continue to operate at Philadelphia, and the Mint’s current practice of not charging fees for refining silver or any used alloy metal should be changed.
1823 III.4.665 A committee report to the House of Representatives, regarding the continued currency of the crowns and five franc pieces of France. Because of the general scarcity of gold and silver coins, and because the mentioned silver coins of France form most of the precious metal coins now held by banks in the United States, letting their currency lapse would only worsen a difficult situation. A bill continuing their currency for another two years is proposed. Some verification needed.
1823 III.4.667 A committee report to the House of Representatives, regarding the continued currency of foreign gold coins. Due to the scarcity of gold coins, the Receivers of Public Moneys should continue to receive foreign gold coins for purchases of public lands; the committee feel the Treasury Department’s decision to continue accepting foreign gold coins, even after the expiration of the law making them current, was appropriate and that a new law should continue their currency for public land sales. In an attached letter, Treasury Secretary Crawford again asks that the relative valuation of gold and silver in coins should be changed to a ratio more consistent with the use by our foreign trading partners.
1823 III.5.710 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Treasury Secretary Crawford who sent it to Congress. Some verification needed on some inconsistent values from the 1822 report (#676).
1824 III.4.689 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Robert Patterson to Treasury Secretary Crawford, who relayed it to Congress. The recent assay results for the three types of foreign silver coins still current are stated — they are consistent with prior results. In addition, some recent British and Portuguese gold coins were assayed; no specimens of recent French or Spanish gold coins could be procured.
1824 III.5.726 A report from mint director Moore to President Monroe, who relayed it to Congress. The amount of gold, silver, and copper coins minted in 1824 almost reaches the highest level ever attained, in 1820. This is the third year of inconsiderable deposits of gold, because gold continues to bring a premium over its standard value. Silver deposits have been abundant during the year.
1824 III.5.731 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Treasury Secretary Crawford who sent it to Congress. Some verification needed on some inconsistent values from the 1822 report (#676).
1825 III.5.725 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Samuel Moore to Treasury Secretary Crawford, who relayed it to Congress. The recent assay results for the four types of foreign gold coins and three types of foreign silver coins still current are stated — they are consistent with prior results.
1825 III.5.746 A report from mint director Moore to President Adams, who relayed it to Congress. The amount of gold bullion sourced from North Carolina, at just under $17,000 worth, is more than in any prior year. Although the value of minted coins is less than in the prior year, the number of minted gold and silver coins exceeds that from any year; this is partly due to the availability of less silver bullion, and the decision to produce more silver coins of a small denomination.
1825 III.5.747 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Treasury Secretary Rush who sent it to Congress.
1825 III.5.748 An assay of foreign coins, from mint director Samuel Moore to Treasury Secretary Rush, who relayed it to Congress. Director Moore summarizes the report from the mint’s assayer for the four types of foreign gold coins and three types of foreign silver coins still current, and then summarizes the assays from the last ten years.
1826 III.5.767 As requested by a resolution of the Senate, a detailed assay of foreign coins, from mint director Samuel Moore to Treasury Secretary Rush, to President Adams, who relayed it to Congress. Evidently the summary, as presented in #748, did not go over well with Congress, who expected a level of details as found in earlier assay reports. Pure copper is found to be the common alloy in silver coins, while the alloy for gold coins is some combination of copper and silver. Although some mints use a constant ratio between the copper and silver in their gold coinage, other mints do not; the U.S. uses an alloy with equal parts of copper and silver to obtain a pleasing consistent color for the gold coins. Some verification needed.
1826 III.5.783 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Treasury Secretary Rush who sent it to Congress.
1827 III.5.827 A report from mint director Moore to President Adams, who relayed it to Congress. The fineness of the gold bullion from North Carolina generally exceeds the fineness of our gold coins. The supply of silver has been unusually abundant. Prepaid orders for copper coins can be shipped at mint expense and risk to all commonly accessible locations in the United States.
1827 III.5.911 The required annual financial statements, on the operation of the mint, from Treasury Secretary Rush who sent it to Congress.
1827 III.5.912 A short report regarding an assay of the foreign coins that are current in the United States, from mint director Samuel Moore to Treasury Secretary Rush, who relayed it to Congress.
1828 HED69 A short report from mint director Samuel Moore to President Adams, who relayed it to Congress. The value of gold received from North Carolina is more than twice the value received in any prior year. In its first 35 years of operation, the mint has produced about 32 millions of dollars worth of coins. In the last five years, the annual rate of production is $2 million, and the annual expense is about $28,000.
1829 HED56 A short report from mint director Samuel Moore to President Jackson, who relayed it to Congress. The increase in the amount of gold received from North Carolina in recent years is deemed remarkable (currently $128,000). The emission of half dimes, starting on the 4th of July, is more than fourfold the whole amount previously coined.
1830 HED46 A short report from mint director Samuel Moore to President Jackson, who relayed it to Congress. The producing States have increased their annual production, and it is remarkable that Georgia entered the roll of producers with gold worth $212,000. The coinage exceeds that from any prior year, and the amount of bullion in mint vaults has never been higher. The opening of the new mint building will be later than planned.
1831 HED57 A short report from mint director Samuel Moore to President Jackson, who relayed it to Congress. The increase in the domestic gold production continues, with the first mention of small amounts from Tennessee and Alabama. The almost $4,000,000 in coins produced is more than ever produced in a prior year; with the new facility completed soon, a regular bullion supply, and new mint proceedures, a production target of $6,000,000 in coins this year is reasonable.
1832 HED54 A short report from mint director Samuel Moore to President Jackson, who relayed it to Congress. With the increasing domestic gold production, the U.S. mines produced one-sixth as much gold as was produced by the mines of Europe and America. The decline in coin production is blamed on the epidemics in the eastern U.S. cities.
1833 HED48 A short report from mint director Samuel Moore to President Jackson, who relayed it to Congress. The domestic gold production is higher than in any previous year.
1834 HED74 A short report from mint director Samuel Moore to President Jackson, who relayed it to Congress. The amount of silver coined exceeds the amount from the prior year, while the amount of gold exceeds the total from the combined prior nine years! An early increase in silver deposits resulted in delayed payment to depositors, which resulted in reduced deposits later in the year; adjustments have been made, so the mint should handle any similar situation.
1835 HED76 A long report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Jackson, who relayed it to Congress. The total number of silver and copper coins greatly exceeds the number from any prior year. Improvements in the processes and machinery have been started, and more are anticipated. Congress is urged to change the fineness of the gold and silver coins to 900 parts per thousand, so as to simply the long and troublesome calculations for gold (116 parts fine in 129) and silver (1,485 parts fine in 1,664). Construction of the three branch mints proceeds, with reports and documents appended. Some changes to staffing the branch mints are suggested.
1836 HED96 A report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Jackson, who relayed it to Congress. The value of domestically mined gold continues to fall, due to the exhaustion of the surface deposites. Informed individuals express confidence that deep mines will find an immense wealth. Improvements have been made to every department, from a new design for the dollar, to a silver refining method that is faster and less expensive, to reducing the amount of handwork necessary on a die prepared from a hub, to using steam power for all copper coins (and some of the half dollars). All branch mints might be in operation this year.
1837 HED110 A short report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Van Buren, who relayed it to Congress. To answer the need for small coins, more than nine million with a value less than a half dollar were minted; much more than in any previous year. Government deposits at the Mint provide a ready source of coins with which to pay depositors of bullion as soon as the bullion’s value is determined; thus a long standing complaint of the Mint’s operation is resolved. The mint at Charlotte is finished and has commenced some operations, the mint at Dahlonega is nearly completed, and the mint at New Orleans should commence operations shortly.
1838 S98 A report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Van Buren, who relayed it to Congress. As the need for small coins continues, the coinage this year, of pieces of less value than a half dollar, exceeds that of last year. The possession of public funds, in gold and silver coins, allows for most bullion depositors to be paid quickly. The mints at Charlotte and Dahlonega have accepted gold bullion, and have produced coins from that bullion. The mint at New Orleans produced only dimes in its first year of operation, and granted leaves of absence, from August through October, to the officers and workers recently arrived from the north so they could avoid the recent sickly season. The act of 1834 assigns too high of values to foreign gold coins, and should be repealed.
1839 S141 A short report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Van Buren, who relayed it to Congress. This required annual report is late due to the lack of final figures from the New Orleans branch mint — figures as of August 17 are are expected to be close to the year-end figures, due to the closure during the fatal epidemic that saw two officers and four workmen die. Earlier in the year, disagreements among New Orleans officers ended in mutual denouncements; although an investigation showed no reason to suspect the integrity of the officers, the conditions required painful measures (the details of which are not stated). New Orleans now has an able corp of acclimated officers and workmen, so further interruptions are not expected.
Need to find the referenced Statements A-F.
1840 HED168 An assay of current foreign gold and silver coins, from mint director R.M. Patterson to Treasury Secretary Levi Woodbury, who relayed it to Congress. The tables provide current valuations for a range of coins; for some coins, the current law assigns a value higher than deserved.
1841 S40 To be added.
S87 The real tables need to be added; old ones are used as placeholders. A report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Tyler, who relayed it to Congress. The first silver from domestic mines is deposited at the mint, but the small supply of bullion deposits results in the four mint facilities producing only one third of the coins produced in Philadelphia alone in 1836.
1842 HED208 A short report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Tyler, who relayed it to Congress. A new source of silver is Canada, which sent more than $200,000 worth of worn French crowns and half crowns. The production of the mint and its branches was significantly larger than in the prior year. Some verification needed.
1843 HED76 A short report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Tyler, who relayed it to Congress. The value of the coins minted last year far exceeds the value from any former year. The amount of domestic gold sent to the mint and its branches exceeds that of any former year.
1844 HED99 Working on this report.
A short report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Tyler, who relayed it to Congress. The mint building was destroyed by a fire which destroyed a great part of the machinery. Plans and estimates for rebuilding have been brought to Congress. With two million dollars worth of gold produced in the last two years by the region served by the mints at Dahlonega and Charlotte, this region has gold mines as numerous and rich as any in the world.
1846 HED75 Not processed.
1849 HED31 A report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Tyler, who relayed it to Congress. The first gold dollars are minted but not so for the first double-eagles, due to die difficulties. The large amount of California gold does not exceed the amount of gold deposited in 1847. However, mostly foreign gold coins were deposited in 1847 while the native California gold contains an amount of silver higher than the legal coinage standard, requiring additional refining steps. The extra steps produced a large backlog of deposits to be coined, but with additional resources now in place, prompt payment to depositors is foreseen.
1850 S21 A report from mint director R.M. Patterson to President Fillmore, who relayed it to Congress. The gold from California is reaching the mints in much larger quantities than in previous years.
1853 HED40 A report from mint director James Ross Snowden to President Pierce, who relayed it to Congress. The design for the three dollar gold piece is finalized with production expected shortly. Some equipment for the branch mint at San Francisco is slow in arriving, so production is expected to start next year. The recent recoinage of silver is successful, but another recoinage may become necessary. The large amounts of gold from California should be put to use in the replacement of small denomination notes, which could be achieved through a stamp duty on small notes.
1854 HED62 Not processed.
1855 HED70 A report from mint director James Ross Snowden to President Pierce, who relayed it to Congress. Half of the report consists of a descriptive listing of the dies of medals in the collection of the U.S. Mint. This list is a corrected and enlarged version of the listing contained in the Mint Report from 1853.
HED71 A short letter from Secretary of the Treasury James Guthrie to Congress, recommending an additional current-year appropriation to cover the salary increases granted, in an earlier bill, to some clerks at the New Orleans branch mint.
From this point on, the annual reports are for the fiscal year ending June 30 of the listed year.
1863 HR17 A report from the Committee of Ways and Means, endorsing the idea of a branch mint in Carson City, Nevada Territory. Interesting geological and commercial information is presented in support.
1863 The coinage is reduced for another year, and for the same reasons. A branch mint opens at Denver, Colorado Territory, but processes only bullion to date. Although the small cent is more popular than the discontinued large cent, the inclusion of nickel to give it an intrinsic value closer to one cent provides no benefit and should be discontinued.
1874 Not processed.
1875 Not processed.
1876 Not processed.
1877 Not processed.
1878 Not processed.
1879 Not processed.
1880 Not processed.
1881 Not processed.
1882 Not processed.
1883 Not processed.
1884 Not processed.
1885 Not processed.
1886 Not completely processed.
The price of silver, in terms of gold, continues to fall. Philadelphia mint runs out of room to store silver dollars. The New York Assay Office introduces new equipment to eliminate the release of noxious fumes that angered its neighbors. The old carpets from the adjusting room in the San Francisco mint are burned and produce 172 ounces of gold, and 44 ounces of silver. Questionaires were sent to the mints of most nations, and their responses form the bulk of this report; a world wide snapshot of contemporary mint and monetary practices.
1887 Not processed.
1888 Not processed.
1889 Not processed.
1890 Not processed.
1891 Not processed.
1892 Not processed.
1893 Not processed.
1894 Not processed.

Let me know if you have any of the reports not listed. I am looking to buy reports, especially if they are not in nice condition; but only if the text is readable. Loose bindings, separated bindings, water stains, page tears, and such are okay, provided that the text is present and readable. In the case of the early reports which are quite small, I would like to buy either an original or a clear copy.

Contributors

I gratefully acknowledge the following sources, for providing me with photocopies of reports I did not have.

Wayne K. Homren
Fred Weinberg
Newman Numismatic Portal

Related Sites

Tired of waiting for me to transcribe the early reports into HTML? The government has made available page images of the entire American State Papers. Class 3, Finance, includes the Mint Reports up to 1828:

American State Papers, Finance volumes

The St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank has made available page images of the entire Annual Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances. Each report is in its own PDF file, with sizes ranging from under one megabyte to more than 75 megabytes. These annual reports contain the reports of the many departments of the Treasury, including the Bureau of the Mint:

Annual Reports of the Secretary of the Treasury