Annual Report

of the

Director of the Mint,

for the

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1864.






Philadelphia:
Bryson & Son, Printers and Stationers
1865.


Mint of the United States,
Philadelphia, October 3d, 1864.

Sir:—I have the honor to present the following report of operations of the Mint and its Branches, for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1864.

The coinage of the late fiscal year although not so large as in some former years, exhibits, notwithstanding the disturbed condition of the country, a Satisfactory increase over the coinage of 1863.

The amount of bullion in value, received at the Mint and Branches, during the fiscal year, was as follows:—

Gold, $23,986,989 92; silver, $933,818 65; total deposits, $24,920,808 47. From this total a deduction must be made for the bullion re-deposited; or bars made at one Branch of the Mint, and deposited at another for coinage. Deducting the re-deposits the amount will be $24,012,741 49.

The coinage for the same period was as follows:— Gold coin, $21,649,345 00; unparted and fine gold bars, $2,333,403 31; silver coin, $548,214 10; silver bars, $301,872 89; cents coined, $463,800; total coinage, $25,296,635 30; number of pieces of all denominations coined, 46,983,396.

The distribution of the bullion received at the Mint and Branches was as follows:— at Philadelphia, gold deposited, $3,002,287 19; gold coined, $2,580,945 00; fine gold bars, $307,322 07; silver deposits and purchases, $223,695 77; silver coined, $200,714 10; silver bars, $7,665 23; cents coined $463,800 00; total coinage, $3,560,436 40; number of pieces, 45,114,276; total deposits of gold and silver, $3,225,982 96.

At the Branch Mint, San Francisco, the gold deposits were $18,913,547 70; gold coined, $19,068,400 00; silver deposits and purchases, $418,570 80; silver coined, $347,500 00; silver bars, $120,909 02; total coinage of gold and silver $19,536,809 02; number of pieces, 1,869,120.

The Assay Office in New York received during the year, in gold bullion, $1,584,825 06; and in silver, $291,551 98. Number of fine gold bars stamped at that office, 1,812:— value, $1,539,751 27; silver bars 1,947:— value, $173,308 64; total value of gold and silver bullion, $1,876,377 04.

The Branch Mint at Denver, Colorado Territory, during the past year, has been successfully engaged in melting, refining, assaying, and stamping gold bullion, returning the same to the depositor in the form of unparted bars, bearing the Government stamp of weight and fineness. The number of bars stamped was, 532;— value, $486,329 97.

The efficiency and usefulness of this Branch would be greatly increased, if a safe and expeditious mode of transportation could be secured. An over-land route of six hundred miles is a formidable obstacle in the way of commercial intercourse with our eastern cities and markets. In addition, the hostility of the Indian tribes along the route, doubtless instigated by rebel emissaries, and bad white men, has increased the difficulty and dangers of inter-communication, and the transportation of bullion to the Atlantic markets. These difficulties will probably be obviated in due time, and that institution will then assume her proper position as a Branch Mint.

Efforts have been made to introduce a system of purchases and exchanges, by which the Government will assume the risk of transporting bullion from Denver, to places where it may be needed for coinage, or purchase. The Government by purchasing the bullion at Denver and paying therefor by draft in specie on the Treasurers in the Atlantic States, would relieve the owners of all responsibility, and enable them to convert their bullion into eastern funds, with but little expense. The Act of Congress, establishing a Branch Mint at Denver, provides, “that the Superintendent of said Branch Mint be authorized, under the direction of the Secretary of the Treasury, and on terms to be prescribed by him, to issue in payment of the gold dust and bullion deposited for assay and coinage or bars, drafts or certificates of deposit payable at the Treasury, or any Sub-Treasury of the United States, to any depositor electiug to receive payment in that form.” This provision embodies the true policy of the Government, in relation to the deposits of bullion in Branch Mints, or Assaying Offices distant from our great commercial centers. Its accomplishment would not only benefit the hardy miner, and the gold regions of Colorado, but also the general commercial interests of the country and Government. Renewed efforts ought to be made to introduce this system, and when the difficulties now in the way are removed, and the over-land stage route to Denver is in full and successful operation, satisfactory arrangements can be made with that company and others, by which the bullion purchased by the Government, will be safely brought to the eastern cities and depositories.

Gold-Mining Regions.

The reports from the gold and silver regions of our country are very satisfactory, and indicate an abundant and increasing production. The places whence the deposits were obtained, and the amount from each locality, are set forth in the tabular statements attached to this report. These tables contain nearly all we have to say on the subject of our gold-mining regions. There is occasionally an uncertainty as to the origin of a deposit of gold, and Idaho may have obtained some credits which belong to Colorado. Every precaution, however, is taken to have the deposit credited to its proper locality, and where an uncertainty arises, it is credited to the region which the nature of the bullion indicates it to belong. In relation to Idaho, it may be stated, that the production of the last, largely exceeded that of the previous fiscal year; and the indications of a still larger yield are most encouraging. The statistics found in this report prove the correctness of these remarks. For the fiscal year, ending June 30th, 1863, the amount of gold bullion received from Idaho was, $1,816 97; during the past year the amount reached $2,306,568 10; an increase of more than two millions in one year. Indian hostilities, and the troubled state of the country generally, have affected, to some extent, the operations in our gold-producing localities; still our mining regions are the scenes of activity and excitement, and enterprise and capital are fast taking possession of them. In some places, especially where the mining is superficial, individual enterprise is sufficient, but in others, and especially in Colorado, the force of companies with large resources is necessary. Such organizations, under prudent and proper management, cannot fail to be successful; realizing large profits for themselves, and at the same time developing, by associated capital and labor, the national resources and wealth. Within the past year, large investments in that region have been made by parties in New York, Philadelphia and elsewhere. From Nova Scotia we receive some gold, and occasionally small deposits from Canada. A report from the latter region in pamphlet form, received some months ago, does not afford much encouragement as to paying returns; but more recent discoveries render it not improbable that a new and successful gold region will be there developed. Australia and New Zealand continue to be very productive, and doubtless Siberia also, although we have no direct information from that quarter. The past fifteen years has been an era of wonderful activity in gold mining, and the effects of this addition of gold to the wealth of the world upon industrial pursuits, commerce and civilization, are everywhere manifest. But wealth alone cannot secure the peace and prosperity of a nation. Virtue and truth, more than gold and silver, can make a nation great, and its people prosperous and free.

Silver of Nevada.

The history of the development of any mining region is a romance full of surprising incidents; and none is more so than that of Nevada Territory. From the first discovery of silver, in June, 1859, to the present moment, that country has been a scene of excited search, toil and speculation, of rapid fortunes, severe losses and disappointments. It would be out of place in this report to enter into details which may be found elsewhere, but to inquire what becomes of all this vast yield of silver, and what benefit is to ensue to our country from its production, is certainly alike proper and instructive. In a time of peace, shall we have a share of the gold and silver of our own mines, for our currency and use, or must it be carried off to the plethoric vaults of European banks and capitalists? This latter is precisely the direction all the silver has taken thus far. Among the injuries inflicted upon us by the rebellion, not the least serious is the banishment of silver. None of the Nevada silver is coined here, and but little at San Francisco, where it first goes. Our correspondents at that port inform us that it is all shipped to England, partly in rich ores that can more economically be smelted there, and partly in metallic bars. We have also some information from London as to the receipt of this bullion; but not comprehensive enough to serve as a statistical return. In fact, we do not know how much silver is raised from those mines. They are rich and valuable. We know that some of the best of them sell in the market, at $2,500 to $5,000 specie, for one foot frontage, and have yielded from two to four per cent. monthly, on such prices. These mines are not held by British capitalists, nor worked by British subjects, although many of the miners are from Cornwall and Ireland. They are held and controlled by our own citizens, changing owners frequently, as the stock market is extremely active, and prices very fluctuating. The reasons for the disappearance of this silver are very obvious, particularly in this crisis of our country’s history. The war in which we are now engaged, has compelled a resort to paper currency to meet the increased taxation and expenditures of the nation. This currency supplies the place of specie, which increases in value commercially, in proportion to the increase of the paper circulation. Its commercial value being thus increased, it ceases to be a circulating medium, and is either hoarded at home, or sent abroad in payment of foreign importations.

Again, the diminished export of our leading products, especially cotton, and the continuance of extravagant and unnecessary importations, (often forced upon our market by unfriendly foreign importers) have caused the balance of trade to be largely against us, requiring the export of our precious metals to pay a debt, which ought, from every motive of interest, every consideration of patriotism, to have been avoided. War has affected our currency and commerce, has driven our specie from present circulation, and poured it into the coffers of the foreign merchant and capitalist. Peace will restore what war has destroyed, the untiring energy of the American people will regain what has been lost, and make our commerce and currency rival that of the most favored nations. Our nation lives, and in the exercise of patience, perseverance, patriotism, and a real confidence in the sentiment recently stamped upon some of our coinage, “In Giod we trust,” we may hope for a speedy restoration of peace and union, a higher national life, and a more perfect and enduring nationality.

Assay Offices.

The rapid development of our gold-mining regions, and the discovery of new and rich deposits of the precious metals, render it incumbent upon the Government to provide facilities for the melting, assaying and stamping of bullion, in those territories in which the mines are located. These mines afford a wide field for well-directed enterprise, and profitable investment of capital. Already large and well-conducted private refining and assaying establishments have been put in successful operation. They will doubtless be increased in number and capacity, when demanded by an increased production of the precious metals; and whilst the business of refining and parting by private enterprise should be encouraged, the true national policy is to provide Government Assay Offices, which will afford the mining and commercial interests of those regions every practicable facility that can be desired. Neither public nor private interests, national or local considerations, require the multiplication of Branch Mints for coinage. When located far from our great commercial centres, the difficulties and expense necessarily attending their operations, greatly outweigh every advantage that can be derived from their establishment. The Mints now in operation are sufficient for the coinage of all the gold and silver that can be produced in the United States. San Francisco is the commercial and economical point for the coinage of the precious metals produced from the mines of the states and territories, west of the Rocky Mountains. The parent Mint in Philadelphia occupies the same position in reference to the Atlantic States. These two great central institutions, in their capacity for coinage, can abundantly meet any governmental or commercial demand. These for coinage, and the establishment of Assay Offices by the Government in our mining regions, for melting, refining, assaying and stamping bullion, will secure to the mining interests of the country, every facility that can be desired, and every encouragement that can, with propriety, be expected.

Bronze Coinage.

The substitution of the bronze alloy for the nickel mixture, as authorized by Congress, has been highly successful. The demand for the one and two-cent pieces has been unprecedented, and every effort has been made to meet it. The demand still continues, although the number daily issued largely exceeds that of any former period. Large quantities are hoarded, and thus kept from circulation. They have also been bought and sold by small brokers at a premium; this has induced individuals to collect them for the purpose of sale, thus producing a scarcity and inconvenience to the public that ought not to exist. The proportion of the three metals in the bronze alloy has been steadily maintained, as shown by the constant trials in the assay department, and regularly, as required by law, reported to me. The two-cent piece is a most convenient and popular coin. Its size and weight contribute to its usefulness. The motto, “In God we trust,” stamped upon this coin, has been highly approved by the public, not only as improving the artistic beauty of the piece, but also as expressive of our nation’s reliance upon the “God of Nations” in this hour of peril and danger. Why should this distinct and unequivocal recognition of the sovereignty of God, of Him who is “the King of kings, and Lord of lords” be confined to our bronze coinage? The silver and the gold are His, and upon it should be impressed by national authority, the declaration of our nation’s trust in Him, “who maketh war to cease unto the ends of the earth, who stilleth the raging of the sea, and the tumult of the people.” Let our nation, in its coinage, honor Him, in whom is our strength and salvation.

Aluminum Bronze.

During the past year some interesting experiments were made with aluminum as an alloy for coins; not with a view to displace the bronze coinage, but to propose a system of tokens for five and ten cents. More than two years ago experiments were made in aluminum alloys, to try their fitness for medals. Information was received from Paris, that the introduction of only one per cent. of aluminum, into fine silver, would resist the sulphuretted tarnish, which is so apt to attack that metal in certain exposures. The experiments made here did not confirm that statement; on the contrary, a slip of this alloy (99 silver, 1 aluminum) suffered more discoloration from the vapor of sulphuretted hydrogen, than a slip of fine silver. The alloy was also much harder. An alloy of thirteen parts copper with one of aluminum was then tried, and another of nineteen parts copper to one of aluminum. The former gave a pale gold color, the latter the color of standard gold coin, both beautiful, but too nearly resembling the precious metal. Under the press, however, they were both found to be so hard and stubborn in spite of repeated blows, as to be quite impracticable. The question, however, was still open, whether a different proportion, and the low relief used for coin, would not give a satisfactory result. In fact, we had specimens of aluminum bronze coinage, effected by European manufacturers of aluminum, which proved that the striking was at least practicable, if not easy. A further series of experiments was therefore undertaken here, at the desire of the Secretary of the Treasury and a committee of scientific gentlemen. The latter forwarded to the Mint a bar for this purpose, which, by assay, was found to contain the proportion of nine parts copper to one of aluminum. Their directions were closely follqwed, and the principal results may be briefly stated as follows:— The aluminum bronze, in the proportion just stated, is very rigid under the rolls, requiring many annealings, and liable to crack and break into plates of oblique fracture. It may, however, be gradually brought down to the gauge of our one-cent coin; but in the coining press it is so hard that it will not take a perfect impression, at least not such as can be given to the present legal alloy. The comparative ductility of the aluminum bronze and of pure copper, will be shown by the following result: to draw a wire from the former from 1⁄10 inch diameter down to 1⁄20 inch, required twenty-one draughts and four annealings, while the latter required seven draughts, and no annealings after the initial one. This hardness gives it a great advantage in wear. Coins of the cent size were made of this alloy, of legal bronze, and of pure copper. The three varieties placed in boxes and rapidly shaken for a long time, treated equally in all respects, lost by attrition in the following ratio: assuming the aluminum bronze as the standard of comparison, the legal bronze lost about three times, and the copper about six times as much. This property, however, is of no great consequence in coins of little value. A point of much greater consideration, is the avoidance or mitigation of the tendency to change color and become foul from the usual causes, viz:— the action of oily and saline excretions of the hand, the chemical agencies which are met with in market stalls, and the slops of drinking saloons, and the mere exposure to the air and moisture. If any metal, or alloy, could be found that would look well and keep clean with the usage to which our small coins are generally subjected, it would be deservedly popular. This can scarcely be expected. A silver coin can be deprived of its original beauty, and become of such a hue, as to have its genuineness called into question. Pure aluminum, white at first, assumes a bluish tint by atmospheric action; and aluminum bronze, although closely resembling gold at first, was found, after being held in the sweaty hand for a few hours, to have received an ugly tarnish, which destroyed the last argument for employing it in currency. After these experiments were concluded, others were started, in hopes of finding a binary or ternary alloy, which would answer the required conditions, especially as to ductility and keeping color, for coins of a grade a little above the cent and two-cent pieces. After some progress had been made, it became evident, from the fact that cents were hoarded to such an extent as to keep them out of circulation, that in the present state of the currency, it would be futile to attempt to carry out the project. More than this, we believe that the end of our nation’s troubles is nigh, and that peace will soon bless our country. With peace we may confidently expect an influx of silver, always more acceptable than any substitute, which will supply every want, and furnish a currency of “small coins” equal to any demand. Our country is full of the precious metals, — the supply inexhaustible. Peace will restore prosperity, and gold and silver will soon resume their proper channels in the currency of the country.

The Silver Dollar.

Permit me again to refer to the anomalous character of the silver dollar of the United States, and to the observations on this subject in former reports. The whole dollar should be made, in weight and value, the exact multiple of our fractional silver currency, and the gold dollar should be, by law, declared the unit of value of our money.

Statement of Foreign Coins.

The statement of foreign coins, as required by law, will be found appended to this report.

We have no change to make in these tables, except in the single item of the average fineness and value of the British sovereign. Heretofore we have reported new coins at 916½ thousandths fine; the weight 256-7 thousandths of an ounce, and the value before deduction, $4.86.34. Their standard of fineness is 916⅔; but our mode of reporting is to the half thousandth, and the above is the nearest statement we can make, of the American value of a pound sterling in perfect condition. At the same time, in consequence of the usual admixture of old coins in any lot, we have been reporting the average of weight, fineness and value, at lower figures, making about two cents less per sovereign or pound. The skillful and exact methods of assaying and alloying which have been pursued in the British Mint, have brought up the average fineness to such a measure, that we might report them as of full standard, if it were not that there are still a good many old pieces to be met with, whose fineness is not over 915½. We might call the average, even with these, 916¼, but in accordance with our method, we cannot put them down higher than 916. The corrected statement will be found in the table of gold coins.

It is necessary to add, that the “value after deduction” means simply, after deducting the Mint charge of one-half per cent. If brought to the Mint for recoinage, a Government tax of one-half per cent. will further be deducted; which holds true of all coins except old gold coins of the United States, prior to the change of standard in 1834.

The Medal Department of the Mint, is in successful operation, and its productions duly appreciated by the Government and the public.

Some valuable additions have been made to the Cabinet, by purchase or gift during the past year. This department of our institution is very attractive, and the multitude of visitors attests the value and usefulness of this collection of coins and medals.

List of Tables in Appendix.

A.— Statement of Bullion deposited at the Mint of the United States and Branches, during the fiscal year, ending June 30th, 1864.

B.— Statement of the Coinage at the Mint of the United States and Branches, during the fiscal year, ending June 30th, 1864.

C.— Statement of Gold and Silver of domestic production, deposited at the Mint of the United States and Branches, during fiscal year, ending June 30th, 1864.

D.— Coinage of the Mint and Branches, from their organization to close of fiscal year, ending June 30th, 1864.

E.— Gold of domestic production, deposited at the Mint of the United States and Branches, to June 30th, 1864.

F.— Statement of the amount of Silver coined at the Mint of the United States, and Branches at San Francisco and New Orleans, under the Act of February 21st, 1853.

G.— Statement of the amount of Silver of domestic production, deposited at the Mint of the United States and Branches, from January, 1841, to June 30th, 1864.

H.— Cents of old issue deposited at the United States Mint, for exchange for the Nickel Cent, to April 22d, 1864.

I.— Statement of the weight, fineness and value of Foreign Gold Coin.

J.— Statement of the weight, fineness and value of Foreign Silver Coin.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES POLLOCK,
Director of the Mint.

Hon. W. P. Fessenden,
   Secretory of the Treasury,
      Washington, D. C.
.


A.— Statement of Deposits at the Mint of the United States, the Branch Mint San Francisco, Assay Office New York, and Branch Mint at Denver, during the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1864.

Description of bullion. Mint United States Philadelphia. Branch Mint San Francisco. Assay Office New York. Branch Mint Denver. Total.
   GOLD.
Fine Bars $542,443 52 $542,443 52
Unparted Bars 128,896 95 128,896 95
U. S. Bullion 1,911,184 04 $18,481,350 20 $1,170,061 06 $486,329 97 22,048,925 27
U. S. Coin 62,690 15 1,972 00 64,662 15
Jeweler’s Bars 209,674 07 141,974 00 351,648 07
Foreign Coin 96,816 23 185,296 00 282,112 23
Foreign Bullion 50,582 23 432,197 50 85,522 00 568,301 73





Total gold $3,002,287 19 $18,913,547 70 $1,584,825 06 $486,329 97 $23,986,989 92





   SILVER.
Bars $119,379 51 $119,379 51
U. S. Bullion 40,338 03 $418,570 80 $28,533 00 487,438 83
U. S. Coin 24,524 66 22,194 00 46,718 66
Jeweler’s Bars 26,648 40 62,588 00 89,236 40
Foreign Coin 11,882 88 154,736 98 166,619 86
Foreign Bullion 930 29 23,495 00 24,425 29





Total silver $223,695 77 $418,570 80 $291,551 98 $933,818 55
Less redeposits at the different institutions: G  




Total gold and silver $3,225,982 96 $19,332,118 50 $1,876,377 04 $486,329 97 $24,920,808 47
Less Re Deposits at different institutions. Gold, $788,687 47; Silver, $119,379 51 908,066 98
  $3,225,982   $19,332,118   $1,876,377   $486,329
Total Deposits $24,012,741 49


B.— Statement of the Coinage at the Mint of the United States, the Branch Mint San Francisco, Assay Office New York, and Branch Mint at Denver,during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864.

Denomination. Mint of the United States.
Philadelphia.
Branch Mint.
San Francisco.
Assay Office.
New York.
Branch Mint.
Denver.
Total.
GOLD.
Pieces. Value. Pieces. Value. Value. Value. Pieces. Value.
Double Eagles 125,962 $2,519,240 00 947,320 $18,946,400 00 1,073,282 $21,465,640 00
Eagles 3,580 35,800 00 5,000 50,000 00 8,580 85,800 00
Half Eagles 300 1,500 00 10,000 50,000 00 10,300 51,500 00
Three Dollars 5,490 16,470 00 5,490 16,470 00
Quarter Eagles 474 1,185 00 8,800 22,000 00 9,274 23,185 00
Dollars 6,750 6,750 00 6,750 6,750 00
Fine Bars 307,322 07 $1,539,751 27 1,847,073 34
Unparted Bars $486,329 97 486,329 97








Total Gold 142,556 $2,888,267 07 971,120 $19,068,400 00 $1,539,751 27 $486,329 97 1,113,676 $23,982,748 31









SILVER.
Dollars 23,170 $23,170 00 23,170 $23,170 00
Half Dollars 319,970 159,985 00 648,000 $324,000 00 967,970 483,985 00
Quarter Dollars 69,970 17,492 50 20,000 5,000 00 89,970 22,492 50
Dimes 370 37 00 140,000 14,000 00 140,370 14,037 00
Half Dimes 370 18 50 90,000 4,500 00 90,370 4,518 50
Three-Cent Pieces 370 11 10 370 11 10
Bars 7,655 23 120,909 02 $173,308 64 301,872 89








Total Silver 414,220 $208,369 33 898,000 $468,409 02 $173,308 64 1,312,220 $850,086 99









COPPER.
Two-Cent Pieces 1,822,500 $36,450 00 1,822,500 $36,450 00
Cent Pieces 42,735,000 427,350 00 42,735,000 427,350 00
Total Total coinage    







Total Copper 44,557,500 $463,800 00 44,557,500 $463,800 00









Total Coinage 45,114,276 $3,560,436 40 1,869,120 $19,536,809 02 $1,713,059 91 $486,329 97 46,983,396 $25,296,635 30


C.— Statement of Gold and Silver of domestic production, deposited at the Mint of the United States, Branch Mint San Francisco, Assay Office New York, and Branch Mint at Denver, during the fiscal year, ending June 30th, 1864.

Description of Bullion.
Description of Bullion. 
Mint United States
Philadelphia.
Branch Mint
San Francisco.
Assay Office
New York.
Branch Mint
Denver.
Total.
GOLD.  Mint of the United States,   Branch mint, San   Assay office, New 
California $91,663 75 $14,863,657 52 $116,101 06 $15,071,422 33
Colorado 935,146 72 715,208 00 $486,329 97 2,136,684 69
Oregon 14,192 90 2,139,305 00 8,650 00 2,162,147 90
Nevada Territory 944 74 74 00 1,018 74
Idaho Territory 847,782 60 1,257,497 50 201,288 00 2,306,568 10
North Carolina 6,093 85 6,093 85
Arizona 114 72 3,775 00 3,889 72
Washington Territory 7,347 97 7,347 97
Parted from Silver 7,896 79 220,890 18 7,618 00 236,404 97
Mint Bars 117,347 00 117,347 00
Total Total gold and silver, of domestic production  




Total Gold $1,911,184 04 $18,481,350 20 $1,170,061 06 $486,329 97 $22,048,925 27





SILVER.
Lake Superior, $6,162 77 $2,603 00 $8,765 77
Nevada Territory, $310,167 01 1,670 00 311,837 01
Sonora, 45 00 45 00
Parted from Gold, 34,167 26 108,403 79 24,220 00 166,791 05





Total Silver, $40,330 03 $418,570 80 $28,538 00 $487,438 83





Total Gold and Silver of domestic production. $1,951,514 07 $18,899,921 00 $1,198,599 06 $486,329 97 $22,536,364 10


D.— Coinage of the Mint and Branches. From their organization to the close of the Fiscal year ending June 30th, 1864.

1.— MINT OF THE UNITED STATES AT PHILADELPHIA.

GOLD COINAGE.
Period.
    PERIOD.    
Double Eagles. Eagles. Half Eagles. Three Dollars. Quarter Eagles. Dollars. Fine Bars.
Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Value.
1793 to 1817 132,592 845,909 22,197
1818 to 1837 3,087,925 879,903
1838 to 1847 1,227,759 3,269,921 345,526
1848 to 1857 8,122,526 1,970,597 2,260,390 223,015 5,544,900 15,348,599 $33,612,140 46
1858 468,504 13,690 32,633 13,059 113,097 208,724 21,088 10
1859 98,196 8,600 20,718 11,524 76,562 231,873 49,286 59
1860 188,615 16,013 19,724 13,402 13,721 78,743 170,275 34
1861 2,341,921 44,005 56,526 6,072 121,376 13,955 66,434 76
1862 1,052,375 79,299 639,432 5,785 1,253,249 1,799,259 49,421 61
1863 152,963 3,658 6,902 39 20,990 1,950 156,039 74
1864 125,962 3,580 300 5,490 474 6,750 307,322 07







Total 12,551,062 3,499,793 10,240,380 278,386 8,391,995 17,689,853 $34,432,008 67

MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA. [Continued.]

SILVER COINAGE.
Period.
    PERIOD.    
Dollars. Half Dollars. Quarter Dollars. Dimes. Half Dimes. Three Cents. Bars.
Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Value.
1793 to 1817 1,439,517 13,104,433 650,280 1,007,151 265,543
1818 to 1837 1,000 74,793,560 5,041,749 11,854,949 14,463,700
1838 to 1847 879,873 20,203,333 4,952,073 11,387,995 11,093,235
1848 to 1857 350,250 10,691,088 41,073,080 35,172,010 34,368,520 37,778,900 $32,355 55
1858 4,028,000 10,600,000 690,000 4,000,000 1,266,000 843 37
1859 73,500 2,636,000 4,996,000 1,760,000 2,840,000 1,380,000 9,341 08
1860 315,530 349,800 909,800 576,000 870,000 548,000 21,656 30
1861 164,900 741,300 3,034,200 1,573,000 2,787,000 265,000 2,624 37
1862 1,750 2,391,350 2,803,750 1,364,550 2,352,550 608,550 1,797 79
1863 31,400 425,260 412,860 49,460 64,460 93,460 6,897 83
1864 23,170 319,970 69,970 370 370 370 7,655 23







Total 3,280,890 129,684,094 74,543,762 65,435,485 73,105,378 41,940,280 $83,171 52

MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA, [Continued.]

Period.
    PERIOD.    
COPPER COINAGE. TOTAL COINAGE.
Two Cents Cents Half Cents Number of Piecesd Value of Gold. Value of Silver. Value of Copper. Total.
Pieces. Pieces. Pieces.
1793 to 1817 29,316,272 5,235,513 52,019,407 $5,610,957 50 $8,268,295 75 $319,340 28 $14,198,593 53
1818 to 1837 46,554,830 2,205,200 158,882,816 17,639,382 50 40,566,897 15 476,574 30 58,682,853 95
1838 to 1847 34,967,663 88,327,378 29,491,010 00 13,913,019 00 349,676 63 43,753,705 63
1848 to 1857 51,449,979 544,510 244,898,364 256,950,474 46 22,365,413 55 517,222 34 279,833,110 35
1858 23,400,000 44,833,707 10,221,876 60 4,971,823 37 234,000 00 15,427,699 97
1859 30,700,000 44,832,973 2,660,646 59 3,009,241 08 307,000 00 5,976,887 67
1860 34,200,000 38,099,348 4,354,576 84 857,076 30 342,000 00 5,553,653 14
1861 10,166,000 21,315,255 47,963,145 76 1,601,324 37 101,660 00 49,666,130 13
1862 11,600,000 25,951,899 30,036,808 11 2,172,499 29 116,000 00 32,325,307 40
1863 47,845,000 49,108,402 3,340,931 74 365,115 63 478,450 00 4,184,497 37
1864 1,822,500 42,735,000 45,114,276 2,888,267 07 208,369 33 463,800 00 3,560,436 40








Total 1,822,500 362,934,744 7,985,223 813,383,825 $411,158,077 17 $98,299,074 82 $3,705,723 55 $513,162,875 55

2.— BRANCH MINT AT SAN FRANCISCO.

Period.
    PERIOD.    
GOLD COINAGE.
Double Eagles Eagles Half Eagles Three Dollars Quarter Eagles Dollars Unparted Bars Fine Bars.
Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Value. Value.
1854 141,468 123,826 268 246 14,632 $5,641,504 05 $5,863 16
1855 859,175 9,000 61,000 6,600 3,270,594 93 88,782 50
1856 1,181,750 73,500 94,100 34,500 71,120 24,600 3,047,001 29 122,136 55
1857 604,500 10,000 47,000 5,000 20,000
1858 885,940 27,800 58,600 9,000 49,200 20,000 816,295 65
1859 689,140 2,000 9,720 8,000 15,000 19,871 68
1860 579,975 10,000 16,700 7,000 28,800 13,000
1861 614,300 6,000 8,000 14,000
1862 760,000 18,000 18,000 30,000
1863 866,423 9,000 16,500 4,000
1864 947,320 5,000 10,000 8,800








Total 8,129,991 294,126 339,888 62,100 234,166 87,232 $12,775,395 92 $236,653 89

2.— BRANCH MINT, SAN FRANCISCO, [Continued.]

Period. SILVER COINAGE. TOTAL COINAGE.
Dollars Half Dollars Quarter Dollars Dimes Half Dimes Bars Value. Number of Pieces. Gold Value. Silver Value. Total Value.
Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces.
1854 280,440 $9,731,574 21 $9,731,574 21
1855 121,950 412,400 1,470,125 20,957,677 43 $164,075 00 21,121,752 43
1856 211,000 286,000 $23,609 45 1,976,570 28,315,537 84 200,609 45 28,516,147 29
1857 86,000 28,000 800,500 12,490,000 00 50,000 00 12,540,000 00
1858 218,000 63,000 30,000 19,752 61 1,361,540 19,276,095 65 147,502 61 19,423,598 26
1859 15,000 463,000 172,000 90,000 29,469 87 1,463,860 13,906,271 68 327,969 87 14,234,241 55
1860 5,000 693,000 24,000 40,000 211,411 52 1,417,475 11,889,000 00 572,911 52 12,461,911 52
1861 350,000 52,000 100,000 71,485 61 1,144,300 12,421,000 00 269,485 61 12,690,485 61
1862 1,179,500 120,000 219,500 1,278 65 2,345,000 15,545,000 00 642,978 65 16,187,978 65
1863 1,542,000 43,000 291,250 100,000 224,763 68 2,872,173 17,510,960 00 1,040,638 68 18,551,598 68
1864 648,000 20,000 140,000 90,000 120,909 02 1,869,120 19,068,400 00 468,409 02 19,536,809 02










Total 20,000 5,512,450 1,220,400 910,750 190,000 $702,680 41 17,001,103 $181,111,516 81 $3,884,580 41 $184,996,097 22

3.— BRANCH MINT, NEW ORLEANS. (To January 31st, 1861.)

Period. GOLD COINAGE.
Double Eagles Eagles Half Eagles Three Dollars Quarter Eagles Dollars.
Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces.
1838 to 1847 1,026,342 709,925 550,528
1848 to 1857 730,500 534,250 108,100 24,000 546,100 1,004,000
1858 47,500 21,500 13,000 34,000
1859 24,500 4,000
1860 4,350 8,200
1861 (to January 31st.) 9,600 5,200
 1861 (to January 31st.) 





     Total 816,450 1,599,492 831,025 24,000 1,130,628 1,004,000

3.— BRANCH MINT NEW ORLEANS (Continued.)

Period SILVER COINAGE. TOTAL COINAGE.
Dollars Half Dollars Quarter Dollars Dimes Half Dimes Three Cents Bars No. of Pieces. Value of Gold. Value of Silver. Total Value Coined.
Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Value.
1838 to 1847 59,000 13,509,000 3,273,600 6,473,500 2,789,000 28,390,895 $15,189,365 00 $8,418,700 00 $23,608,065 00
1848 to 1857 40,000 21,406,000 4,556,000 5,690,000 8,170,000 720,000 43,528,950 22,934,250 00 12,881,100 00 35,815,350 00
1858 4,614,000 1,416,000 1,540,000 2,540,000 10,226,000 1,315,000 00 2,942,000 00 4,257,000 00
1859 200,000 4,912,000 544,000 440,000 1,060,000 334,996 47 7,184,500 530,000 00 3,223,996 47 3,753,996 47
1860 280,000 2,212,000 388,000 370,000 1,060,000 25,422 33 4,322,550 169,000 00 1,598,422 33 1,767,422 33
1861 (to Jan 31.) 395,000 828,000 16,818 33 1,237,800 244,000 00 825,818 33 1,069,818 33
 1861 (to Jan 31) 










1860 Total 974,000 47,481,000 10,177,600 14,513,500 15,619,000 720,000 $377,237 13 94,890,695 $40,381,615 00 $29,890,037 13 $70,271,652 13

4.—BRANCH MINT, DAHLONEGA.

GOLD COINAGE.
Period. Half Eagles Three Dollars Quarter Eagles Dollars Total Pieces. Total Value.
Pieces. Pieces. Pieces. Pieces.
1838 to 1847 576,553 134,101 710,654 $3,218,017 50
1848 to 1857 478,392 1,120 60,605 60,897 601,014 2,607,729 50
1858 19,256 900 1,637 21,793 100,167 00
1859 11,404 642 6,957 19,003 65,582 00
1860 12,800 1,602 1,472 15,874 69,477 00
1861 (to February 28th.) 11,876 1,566 13,442 60,946 00
 1861 (to February 28th.) 





      Total 1,110,281 1,120 197,850 72,529 1,381,780 $6,121,919 00

5.—BRANCH MINT, CHARLOTTE.

GOLD COINAGE.
Period. Half-Eagles. Quarter-Eagles. Dollars. Total Pieces. Total Value.
Pieces. Pieces. Pieces.
1838 to 1847 269,424 123,576 393,000 $1,656,060 00
1848 to 1857 500,872 79,736 103,899 684,507 2,807,599 00
1858 31,066 9,056 40,122 177,970 00
1859 39,500 5,235 44,735 202,735 00
1860 23,005 7,469 30,474 133,697 50
1861 (to March 31) 14,116 14,116 70,580 00
 1861 (to March 31) 




      Total 877,983 219,837 109,134 1,206,954 $5,048,641 50

6.— ASSAY OFFICE, NEW YORK.

Period. Fine Gold Bars Value. Fine Silver Bars Value. Total Value.
1854 $2,888,059 18 $2,888,059 18
1855 20,441,813 63 20,441,813 63
1856 19,396,046 89 $6,792 63 19,402,839 52
1857 9,335,414 00 123,317 00 9,458,731 00
1858 21,798,691 04 171,961 79 21,970,652 83
1859 13,044,718 43 272,424 05 13,317,142 48
1860 6,831,532 01 222,226 11 7,053,758 12
1861 19,948,728 88 187,078 63 20,135,807 51
1862 16,094,768 44 415,603 57 16,510,372 01
1863 1,793,838 16 158,542 91 1,952,381 07
1864 1,539,751 27 173,308 64 1,713,059 91



      Total $133,113,361 93 $1,731,255 33 $134,844,617 26

7.— BRANCH MINT, DENVER.

Period. Unparted Gold Bars Value.
1864 $486,329 97

8.— Summary Exhibit of the Coinage of the Mint and Branches to the Close of the Year Ending June 30, 1864.

Mints. Commencement of Coinage. Gold Coinage Value. Silver Coinage Value. Copper Coinage Value. Entire Coinage.
Pieces. Value.
Philadelphia, 1793 $411,158,077 17 $98,299,074 82 $3,705,723 55 813,383,834 $513,162,875 54
San Francisco, 1854 181,111,516 81 3,884,580 41 17,002,103 184,996,097 22
New Orleans, (to January 31, 1861.) 1838 40,381,615 00 29,890,037 13 94,890,695 70,271,652 13
Charlotte, (to March 31, 1861.) 1838 5,048,641 50 1,206,954 5,048,641 50
Dahlonega, (to February 28, 1861.) 1838 6,121,919 00 1,381,780 6,121,919 00
Assay Office, New York 1854 133,113,361 93 1,731,255 33 134,844,617 26
Denver 1863 486,329 97 486,329 97
 New Orleans, (to January 31, 1861.) 





      Total $777,421,461 38 $133,804,947 69 $3,705,723 55 927,865,366 $914,932,132 62


E.— Statement of gold of domestic production deposited at the Mint of the United States and Branches, to the close of the year ending June 30, 1864.

1.— MINT OF THE UNITED STATES, PHILADELPHIA.

      Period.       Parted from Silver. Virginia. North Carolina. South Carolina. Georgia. Tennessee. Alabama. New Mexico. California.
1804 to 1827 $110,000 00
1828 to 1837 $427,000 00 2,519,500 00 $327,500 00 $1,763,900 00 $12,400 00
1838 to 1847 518,294 00 1,303,636 00 152,366 00 566,316 00 16,499 00 $45,493 00
1848 to 1857 534,491 50 467,237 00 55,626 00 44,577 50 6,669 00 9,451 00 $48,397 00 $226,839,521 62
1858 18,377 00 15,175 00 300 00 18,365 00 1,372,506 07
1859 15,720 00 9,305 00 4,675 00 20,190 00 240 00 275 00 959,191 79
1860 17,402 62 8,450 11 7,556 41 595 88 663,389 02
1861 7,200 29 7,523 80 15,049 41 92 76 426,807 81
1862 $68,864 66 81 38 135 40 244,259 81
1863 3,468 69 69 00 1,178 84 246 66 514 53 109,778 58
1864 7,896 79 6,093 85 91,663 75









Total $80,230 14 $1,538,554 41 $4,448,180 98 $540,467 00 $2,436,336 38 $36,403 88 $55,036 76 $49,186 53 $230,707,118 45

      Period.       Oregon. Colorado. Arizona. Washington Territory. Idaho Territory. Dacotah Territory. Nevada Territory. Other Sources. Total.
1804 to 1827 $110,000 00
1828 to 1837 $13,200 00 5,063,500 00
1838 to 1847 21,037 00 2,623,641 00
1848 to 1857 $54,285 00 7,218 00 228,067,473 62
1858 3,600 00 1,428,323 07
1859 2,960 00 $145 00 1,012,701 79
1860 2,780 16 346,604 05 1,402 01 1,048,180 26
1861 607,592 08 $3,048 37 1,507 96 1,068,822 48
1862 1,122,333 50 $215 70 1,435,890 45
1863 7,910 78 1,896,329 87 3,869 75 $18,563 88 $1,816 97 $2,198 88 $103 68 2,046,050 11
1864 14,192 90 935,146 72 114 72 7,347 97 847,782 60 944 74 1,911,184 04









Total $85,728 84 $4,908,151 22 $7,032 84 $26,127 55 $849,599 57 $2,198 88 $1,048 42 $44,364 97 $245,815,766 82

2.— BRANCH MINT, SAN FRANCISCO.

    Period.     Parted from Silver. California. Colorado. Nevada. Oregon. Dacotah Territory. Washington Territory. Idaho Territory. Total.
1854 $10,842,281 23 $10,842,281 23
1855 20,860,437 20 20,860,437 20
1856 29,209,218 24 29,209,218 24
1857 12,526,826 93 12,526,826 93
1858 19,104,369 99 19,104,369 99
1859 14,098,564 14 14,098,564 14
1860 11,319,913 83 11,319,913 83
1861 12,206,382 64 12,206,382 64
1862 $822,823 01 14,029,759 95 $680 00 $13,000 00 $888,000 00 15,754,262 96
1863 1,108,466 57 13,045,711 69 59,472 00 11,250 00 3,001,104 00 $5,760 00 $12,672 00 17,244,436 26
1864 220,890 18 14,863,657 52 2,139,305 00 $1,257,497 50 18,481,350 20









Total $2,152,179 76 $172,107,123 36 $60,152 00 $24,250 00 $6,028,409 00 $5,760 00 $12,672 00 $1,257,497 50 $181,648,043 62

3.— BRANCH MINT OF NEW ORLEANS.

     Period.      North Carolina. South Carolina. Georgia. Tennessee. Alabama. California. Colorado. Other Sources. Total.
1838 to 1847 $741 00 $14,306 00 $37,364 00 $1,772 00 $61,903 00 $3,613 00 $119,699 00
1848 to 1857 1,911 00 2,317 00 947 00 15,379 00 $21,606,461 54 3,677 00 21,630,692 54
1858 1,560 00 164 12 448,439 84 450,163 96
1859 93,272 41 93,272 41
1860 661 53 97,135 00 $1,770 39 99,566 92
1861 (to Jan. 31.) 19,932 10 1,666 81 21,598 91
 1861 (to Jan. 31.) 








Total 741 00 16,217 00 41,241 00 2,883 12 77,943 53 22,265,240 89 3,437 20 7,290 00 $22,414,993 74

4.—BRANCH MINT CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA.

     Period.      North Carolina. South Carolina. California. Total.
1838 to 1847 $1,529,777 00 $143,941 00 $1,673,718 00
1848 to 1857 2,503,412 68 222,754 17 $87,321 01 2,813,487 86
1858 170,560 33 5,507 16 176,067 49
1859 182,489 61 22,762 71 205,252 32
1860 134,491 17 134,491 17
1861 (to March 31st.) 65,558 30 65,558 30
 1861 (to March 31st.) 



Total $4,520,730 79 $460,523 34 $87,321 01 $5,068,575 14

5.— BRANCH MINT, DAHLONEGA.

Period. Utah. North Carolina. South Carolina. Georgia. Tennessee. Alabama. California. Colorado. Other Sources. Total.
1838 to 1847 $64,351 00 $95,427 00 $2,978,353 00 $32,175 00 $47,711 00 $3,218,017 00
1848 to 1857 28,278 82 174,811 91 1,159,420 98 9,837 42 11,918 92 $1,224,712 82 $951 00 2,609,931 87
1858 32,322 28 57,891 45 107 33 5,293 52 95,614 58
1859 2,656 88 4,610 35 57,023 12 699 19 $82 70 65,072 24
1860 3,485 70 2,004 36 35,588 92 1,097 37 24,908 86 67,085 21
1861 (to Feb. 28) $145 14 812 79 2,066 91 22,182 14 4,213 79 32,772 28 62,193 05
 1861 (to Feb. 28) 









Total $145 14 $99,585 19 $311,242 81 $4,310,459 61 $42,119 75 $59,629 92 $1,236,016 69 $57,763 84 $951 00 $6,117,913 95

6.— ASSAY OFFICE, NEW YORK.

Period. Parted from Silver. Virginia. North Carolina. South Carolina. Georgia. Alabama. New Mexico. California.
1854 $167 00 $3,916 00 $395 00 $1,242 00 $9,221,457 00
1855 2,370 00 3,750 00 7,620 00 13,100 00 $350 00 25,025,896 11
1856 6,928 00 805 07 4,052 29 41,101 28 233 62 16,529,008 90
1857 1,531 00 1,689 00 2,663 00 10,451 00 1,545 00 9,899,957 00
1858 501 00 7,007 00 6,354 00 12,951 00 2,181 00 19,660,531 46
1859 436 00 20,122 00 700 00 14,756 00 593 00 11,694,872 25
1860 4,202 00 9,755 00 19,368 00 6,023,628 36
1861 3,869 00 2,753 00 670 00 6,900 00 818 00 $6,714 00 19,227,658 14
1862 $241,029 00 316 00 2,232 00 2,065 00 1,469 00 1,543 00 12,580,647 83
1863 34,328 00 130 00 5,580 00 346,244 60
1864 7,618 00 116,101 06








Total $282,975 00 $20,320 00 $52,159 07 $24,519 29 $121,338 28 $5,720 62 $13,837 00 $130,326,002 71

Period. Idaho. Colorado. Utah. Arizona. Oregon. Nevada. Vermont. Other sources. Total.
1854 $9,227,177 00
1855 $1,600 00 25,054,686 11
1856 16,582,129 16
1857 9,917,836 00
1858 $5,581 00 27,523 00 19,722,629 46
1859 $3,944 00 2,866 00 405 00 11,738,694 25
1860 248,981 00 $4,680 00 $1,190 00 6,311,804 36
1861 1,449,166 00 73,734 00 16,871 00 3,181 00 20,792,334 14
1862 912,403 00 391 00 205 00 $40,846 00 3,293 00 13,786,439 83
1863 937,535 00 391 00 7,813 00 $298 00 1,332,319 60
1864 $201,288 00 715,298 00 3,775 00 8,650 00 74 00 117,347 00 1,170,061 06









Total $201,288 00 $4,267,237 00 $78,414 00 $22,618 00 $28,296 00 $40,920 00 $298 00 $150,168 00 $135,636,110 97

7.— BRANCH MINT, DENVER.

Period. Colorado.
1864 $486,329 97

8.— SUMMARY EXHIBIT OF THE ENTIRE DEPOSITS OF DOMESTIC GOLD AT THE MINT OF THE UNITED STATES AND BRANCHES, TO JUNE 30, 1864.

       Mint.        Parted from Silver. Virginia. North Carolina. South Carolina. Georgia. Alabama. Tennessee. California. Colorado. Utah.
Philadelphia $80,230 14 $1,538,554 41 $4,448,180 98 $540,467 00 $2,436,336 38 $55,036 76 $36,403 88 $230,707,118 45 $4,908,151 22
San Francisco 2,152,179 76 172,107,123 36 60,152 00
New Orleans 741 00 16,217 00 41,241 00 77,943 53 2,883 12 22,265,240 89 3,437 20
Charlotte 4,520,730 79 460,523 34 87,321 01
Dahlonega 99,585 19 311,242 81 4,310,459 61 59,629 92 42,119 75 1,236,016 69 57,763 84 $145 14
Assay Office 282,975 00 20,320 00 52,159 07 24,519 29 121,338 28 5,720 62 130,326,002 71 4,267,237 00 78,414 00
Denver 486,329 97










Total $2,515,384 90 $1,558,874 41 $9,121,397 03 $1,352,969 44 $6,909,375 27 $198,330 83 $81,406 75 $556,728,823 11 $9,783,071 67 $78,559 14

       Mint.        Arizona. New Mexico. Oregon. Nevada Territory. Dacotah Territory. Idaho Territory. Washington Territory. Vermont. Other Sources. Total.
Philadelphia $7,032 84 $49,186 53 $85,728 84 $1,048 42 $2,198 88 $849,599 57 $26,127 55 $44,364 97 $245,815,766 82
San Francisco 6,028,409 00 24,250 00 $5,760 00 $1,257,497 50 12,672 00 181,648,043 62
New Orleans 7,290 00 22,414,993 74
Charlotte 5,068,575 14
Dahlonega 951 00 6,117,913 95
Assay Office 22,618 00 13,837 00 28,296 00 40,920 00 201,288 00 $298 00 150,168 00 135,636,110 97
Denver 486,329 97










Total $29,650 84 $63,023 53 $6,142,433 84 $66,218 42 $7,958 88 $2,308,385 07 $38,799 55 $298 00 $202,773 97 $597,187,734 21


F.— Statement of the amount of Silver coined at the Mint of the United States, and its Branches at San Francisco and New Orleans, under the Act of February 21, 1853.

    Year.     United States Mint at Philadelphia. Branch Mint at San Francisco. Branch Mint New Orleans to January 31, 1861. Total.
1853 $7,806,461 00 $1,225,000 00 $9,031,461 00
1854 5,340,130 00 3,246,000 00 8,586,130 00
1855 1,393,170 00 $164,075 00 1,918,000 00 3,475,245 00
1856 3,150,740 00 177,000 00 1,744,000 00 5,071,740 00
1857 1,333,000 00 50,000 00 1,383,000 00
1858 4,970,980 00 127,750 00 2,942,000 00 8,040,730 00
1859 2,926,400 00 283,500 00 2,689,000 00 5,898,900 00
1860 519,890 00 356,500 00 1,293,000 00 2,169,390 00
1861 1,433,800 00 198,000 00 414,000 00 2,045,800 00
1862 2,168,941 50 641,700 00 2,810,641 50
1863 326,817 80 815,875 00 1,142,692 80
1864 177,544 10 347,500 00 525,044 10




Total $31,547,874 40 $3,161,900 00 $15,471,000 00 $50,180,774 40


G.— Statement of the amount of Silver of domestic production deposited at the Mint of the United States and Branches, from January, 1841, to June 30, 1864.

        Year.         Parted from Gold. Nevada. Arizona. Sonora. North Carolina. Lake Superior. California. Total.
1841 to 1851 $768,509 00 $768,509 00
1852 404,494 00 404,494 00
1853 417,279 00 417,279 00
1854 328,199 00 328,199 00
1855 333,053 00 333,053 00
1856 321,938 38 321,938 38
1857 127,256 12 127,256 12
1858 300,849 36 $15,623 00 316,472 36
1859 219,647 34 $23,398 00 30,122 13 273,167 47
1860 138,561 70 $102,540 77 $13,357 00 $1,200 00 12,257 00 25,880 58 293,797 05
1861 364,724 73 213,420 84 12,260 00 6,233 00 13,372 72 610,011 29
1862 245,122 47 757,446 60 105 00 21,366 38 $8,224 00 1,032,264 45
1863 188,394 94 856,043 27 13,111 32 1,057,549 53
1864 166,791 55 311,837 01 45 00 8,765 77 487,439 33








Total $4,324,820 59 $2,241,288 49 $25,722 00 $1,245 00 $41,888 00 $128,241 90 $8,224 00 $6,771,429 98


H.— Statement of cents of former issue, deposited at the United States Mint, for exchange for cents of new issue to June 30, 1864.

    Year.     Value by Tale.
1857 $16,602 00
1858 39,404 00
1859 47,235 00
1860 37,500 00
1861 95,245 00
1862 53,365 00
1863 6,185 00
1864 490 00

Total 296,026 00


A Statement of Foreign Gold and Silver Coins,

Prepared by the Director of the Mint, to accompany his Annual Report, in pursuance of the Act of February 21, 1857.


Explanatory Remarks.

The first column embraces the names of the countries where the coins are issued; the second contains the name of the coin, only the principal denominations being given. The other sizes are proportional; and when this is not the case, the deviation is stated.

The third column expresses the weight of a single piece in fractions of the troy ounce, carried to the thousandth, and in a few cases to the ten thousandth of an ounce. The method is preferable to expressing the weight in grains for commercial purposes, and corresponds better with the terms of the mint. It may be readily transferred to weight in grains by the following rule — Remove the decimal point; from one-half deduct four per cent. of that half, and the remainder will be grains.

The fourth column expresses the fineness in thousandths, i.e., the number of parts of pure gold or silver in 1000 parts of the coin.

The fifth and sixth columns of the first table expresses the valuation of gold. In the fifth, is shown the value as compared with the legal content, or amount of fine gold in our coin. In the sixth, is shown the value as paid at the Mint after the uniform deduction of one-half of one per cent. The former is the value for any other purposes than recoinage, and especially for the purpose of comparison; the latter is the value in exchange for our coins at the Mint.

For the silver there is no fixed legal valuation, the law providing for shifting the price according to the condition of demand and supply. The present price of standard silver is 1.22½ cents per ounce, at which rate the values in the fifth column of the second table are calculated. In a few cases, where the coins could not be procured, the data are assumed from the legal rates, and so stated.

I.

GOLD COINS.

Country. Denominations. Weight. Fineness. Value. Value after Deduction.
Central America   Pound, or sovereign, average   Oz.  Dec.  Thous.
Australia Pound of 1852 0.281 916.5 $5 32.37 $5 29.71
     “ Sovereign of 1855-60 0.256.5 916 4 85.58 4 83.16
Austria Ducat 0.112 986 2 28.28 2 27.04
     “ Souverain 0.363 900 6 75.35 6 71.98
     “ New Union Crown (assumed) 0.357 900 6 64.19 6 60.87
Belgium Twenty-five francs 0.254 899 4 72.03 4 69.67
Bolivia Doubloon 0.867 870 15 59.25 15 51.46
Brazil 20 Milreis 0.575 917.5 10 90.57 10 85.12
Central America Two escudos 0.209 853.5 3 68.75 3 66.91
Chili Old doubloon 0.867 870 15 59.26 15 51.47
     “ Ten Pesos 0.492 900 9 15.35 9 10.78
Denmark Ten thaler 0.427 895 7 90.01 7 86.06
Ecuador Four escudos 0.433 844 7 55.46 7 51.69
England Pound or Sovereign, new 0.256.7 916.5 4 86.34 4 83.91
     “ Pound or Sovereign, average 0.256.2 916 4 84.92 4 82.50
France Twenty francs, new 0.207.5 899.5 3 85.83 3 83.91
     “ Twenty francs, average 0.207 899 3 84.69 3 82.77
Germany, North Ten thaler 0.427 895 7 90.01 7 86.06
     “             “ Ten thaler, Prussian 0.427 903 7 97.07 7 93.09
     “             “ Krone, (crown) 0.357 900 6 64.20 6 60.88
     “          South Ducat 0.112 986 2 28.28 2 27.14
Greece Twenty drachms 0.185 900 3 44.19 3 42.47
Hindostan Mohur 0.374 916 7 08.18 7 04.64
Italy Twenty lire 0.207 898 3 84.26 3 82.34
Japan Old cobang 0.362 568 4 44.0 4 41.8
     “ New cobang 0.289 572 3 57.6 3 55.8
Mexico Doubloon, average 0.867.5 866 15 52.98 15 45.22
     “         “        new 0.867.5 870.5 15 61.05 15 53.25
Naples Six ducati, new 0.245 996 5 04.43 5 01.91
Netherlands Ten guilders 0.215 899 3 99.56 3 97.57
New Granada Old Doubloon, Bogota 0.868 870 15 61.06 15 53.26
   “          “ Old Doubloon, Popayan 0.867 858 15 37.75 15 30.07
   “          “ Ten pesos, new 0.525 891.5 9 67.51 9 62.68
Peru Old doubloon 0.867 868 15 55.67 15 47.90
Portugal Gold crown 0.308 912 5 80.66 5 77.76
Prussia New Union Crown (assumed) 0.357 900 6 64.19 6 60.87
Rome 2½ scudi, new 0.140 900 2 60.47 2 59.17
Russia Five roubles 0.210 916 3 97.64 3 95.66
Spain 100 reals 0.268 896 4 96.39 4 93.91
     “ 80 reals 0.215 869.5 3 86.44 3 84.51
Sweden Ducat 0.111 975 2 23.72 2 22.61
Tunis 25 piastres 0.161 900 2 99.54 2 98.05
Turkey 100 piastres 0.231 915 4 36.93 4 34.75
Tuscany Sequin 0.112 999 2 31.29 2 30.14

J.

SILVER COINS.

Country. Denominations. Weight. Fineness. Value.
Germany,  north     Maria Theresa dollar, 1780   Oz.  dec.  Thous.
Austria Old rix dollar 0.902 833 $1 02.27
     “ Old scudo 0.836 902 1 02.64
     “ Florin before 1858 0.451 833 51.14
     “ New florin 0.397 900 48.63
     “ New Union dollar 0.596 900 73.01
     “ Maria Theresa dollar, 1780 0.895 838 1 02.12
Belgium Five francs 0.803 897 98.04
Bolivia New dollar 0.643 903.5 79.07
     “ Half dollar 0.432 667 39.22
Brazil Double Milreis 0.820 918.5 1 02.53
Canada 20 cents 0.150 925 18.87
Central America Dollar 0.866 850 1 00.19
Chili Old dollar 0.864 908 1 06.79
     “ New dollar 0.801 900.5 98.17
Denmark Two rigsdaler 0.927 877 1 10.65
England Shilling, new 0.182.5 924.5 22.96
     “ Shilling, average 0.178 925 22.41
France Five franc, average 0.800 900 98.00
Germany, north Thaler, before 1857 0.712 750 72.67
     “ New thaler 0.595 900 72.89
Germany, south Florin, before 1857 0.340 900 41.65
     “ New florin, (assumed) 0.340 900 41.65
Greece Five drachms 0.719 900 88.08
Hindostan Rupee 0.374 916 46.62
Japan Itzebu 0.279 991 37.63
     “ New Itzebu 0.279 890 33.80
Mexico Dollar, new 0.867.5 903 1 06.62
     “ Dollar, average 0.866 901 1 06.20
Naples Scudo 0.884 830 95.34
Netherlands 2½ guild 0.804 944 1 03.31
Norway Specie daler 0.927 877 1 10.65
New Granada Dollar of 1857 0.803 896 97.92
Peru Old dollar 0.866 901 1 06.20
     “ Dollar of 1858 0.766 909 94.77
     “ Half dollar of 1835-’38 0.433 650 38.31
Prussia Thaler before 1857 0.712 750 72.68
     “ New thaler 0.595 900 72.89
Rome Scudo 0.864 900 1 05.84
Russia Rouble 0.667 875 79.44
Sardinia Five lire 0.800 900 98.00
Spain New pistareen 0.166 899 20.31
Sweden Rix dollar 1.092 750 1 11.48
Switzerland Two Francs 0.323 899 39.52
Tunis Five piastres 0.511 898.5 62.49
Turkey Twenty piastres 0.770 830 86.98
Tuscany Florin 0.220 925 27.70



Note: In Section H, the entry for 1858 in the table of old cents turned in for new cents is $39,404, as in the report for 1863. In the reports up through 1862, however, the amount was shown as $31,404. I have not found an explanation for the change, and I do not know if the correct value is the prior or present value.

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2022 Nov 12
Scanned Original. A value highligted in green means the shown value has been “corrected” from the value in the original.